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Old 01-24-2009, 08:56 PM   #1
luke
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Default 4l60 chevy transmission info

I THOUGHT THIS WOULD BE SOME GOOD INFO

The 4L60-E is an automatic shift, four-speed overdrive, longitudinally positioned transmission. It is now considered to be the best rendition of the finest overdrive automatic transmission ever produced.

History
Before the Late 4L60-E transmission, there was the 700r4, which was introduced in 1982. The 4L60-E is GM's successful continuation of the ever-improving 700R4 (aka "4L60" since 1990), introduced in 1982. The 4L60-E is the "E"lectronically shift controlled version of the 4L60. The Late 4L60-E was released in 1997 in and fully phased into wide use through GM by 1998 in both RWD car platforms (including the C6 Corvette) and trucks in both 2wd and 4wd configurations.

Mechanically, the transmission's power transmitting core remained the same as its predecessor, but the valve body and actuation system for the clutches, bands, etc. is controlled by electronic actuators and solenoids. A Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) is used as the primary feedback sensor, which feeds the PCM or ECM (vehicle powertrain computer) the data to make shift decisions. The engineering of this system is not regarded as a complication, but an elegant simplification and further improvement to this transmission.

The 4L60-E derives its designation from its specifications: 4-speeds, Longitudinally positioned, 6000 lbs. GVW, Electronically controlled, although the transmission sees factory service in trucks up to 8600 lbs.

The strength of the 4L60-E has turned out to be remarkable. Now a darling of the transmission building aftermarket, the 4L60-E is capable of transmitting impressive power from both truck and performance car applications.




Identification
The Late 4L60-E transmission has a three piece case of cast aluminum alloy; bellhousing, main case, and tailhousing. GM shortened the package to 21.9" long - equivalent to a manual transmission of 15.4".

The input shaft has 30 splines. The transmission typically has pinned flare & o-ring fittings on the passenge

r side for a cooling circuit. The transmission has a square oil pan.

The key distinction of the Later 4L60-E (1997-2006) from the Early 4L60-E (1992-1997) or 4L60 (1990-1992) or 700R4 (1982-1989) is the six-bolt "hex" rear output or tailhousing / adapter pattern. The previous versions featured a four-bolt square bolt pattern at the adapter or tailhousing. Additionally, the removeable bellhousing is also another distinguishing feature.

Two-wheel-drive versions have tailhousings and typically a longer output shafts than four-wheel-drive versions, which have various adapter assemblies and a shorter output shaft.

The transmission weighs 146 pounds dry, and 162 wet. It requires 8.4 quarts (9.64" torque converter) or 11.4 quarts (11.81" torque converter) of Dextron III fluid, which the factory claims to be a lifetime fill. Deep pan versions require as much as 14 quarts. Length and volume of the cooling circuit will vary and will require an additional amount.

The 4L60-E is found in nearly every GM rear-wheel-drive application, including the C/K Truck, Sonoma, Jimmy, Tahoe, Yukon, Astro, Safari, Suburban, Bravada, Firebird, Camaro and Corvette.

GM's alternative designations of these transmissions are:

4L60E = M30
4L65E = M32
4L70E = M70
In fact, the "E" has now been removed, ostensibly due to the fact that all GM automatics are now electronically controlled and the distinction is no longer useful.

New Versions Rising
The 4L60E is now concurrently produced along with its strengthened progenitors; the 4L65-E and the 4L70-E. They share most components and improvements together. The 4L65-E was introduced in 2001 as an HD version of the 4L60-E. It has a stronger planetary and a strength-improved output shaft.

4L70-E transmission is a further improvement still, and share most components. However, these versions have strengthened and improved components for the significant power outputs of GM's impressive line of gem 111

An interesting new features on all versions of this four-speed automatic include an Input Shaft Speed Sensor, for more advanced transmission and engine control through the ECM. This sensor is located in the front pump assembly. It is to be fully implemented in all versions by 2008. Individuals swapping these parts through and across years should be aware of the compaitibility issues that this may present.

Transfer Case Adaptability
Adaptation to most of the Jeep transfer cases is an outstanding prospect.

This transmission makes an excellent conversion transmission due to its adaptability into most Jeeps. Both 2wd and 4wd versions of the 4L60-E can be used equally well, and there are no inherent advantages to either one once you have installed our adapter assembly.

Essentially all factory GM 4wd applications available with an OEM configured 4L60-E have adapters and transfer cases that are prohibitively long for a Jeep, and transfer cases whose sizes, strength and gearing fall short of desirable for most Jeep applications. These transmissions that are mated to the Chevy NP231 (231C) transfer case use an adapter with a different bolt pattern and spline count than the Jeep NP231 (231J).

Engine Compatibility and Adaptability
GM

The front face 4L60-E is natively compatible with either the Chevrolet 90 degree “Small Block” & “Big Block” patterned engines (image, right), including the V6, V8 & I6.

Because the transmission is electronically controlled by the PCM and its requisite wiring, it is usually simplest to join the 4L60-E to the engine it came with from the factory. Earlier engines can be joined to the 4L60-E by use of a GM Controller, #12497316. Carbureted engines will require a Throttle Postion Sensor. Individuals converting to earlier engines or engines not controlled by a GM PCM should consider the 700r4 as the simpler and cost-conscious alternative.


Much a part of the transmission is the Powertrain Control Module. GM has scored another hit with this intelligent setup, that puts the engine and transmission under the same management. Standalone transmission controllers do exist on the aftermarket, however it is typically better to run the OBDII / Generation III ) engine and trans as a matched pair.
Summary
GM's commitment to the 4L60-E is apparent in its strength, quality and broad usability. It is hands-down one of the most respectable transmissions of our era, and a very compelling Jeep conversion transmission. The 4L60-E is a very attractive swap option for all Jeeps, with the exception of the CJ5 and other short wheelbased Jeeps - due to powertrain length and driveshaft angle issues. Adaptability to nearly all other Jeeps is exceptional.







FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


1. WHAT ABOUT THE CABLE?

The cable on a 700R4 or 2004R is EXTREMELY important, as it controls not only the timing of the shifts, but also the oil pressure inside the transmission, which controls the firmness of the shifts. If the cable is improperly adjusted or left unhooked, THE TRANSMISSION WILL BURN UP!!


2. ISN'T THE CABLE JUST LIKE THE ONE ON A 350?

NO! The cable on a 350 only controls passing gear. If disconnected, the transmission will not be damaged. Only passing gear will be inoperative.


3. WHAT IF I USE A DIFFERENT CARBURETOR?

If you're connecting the TV cable on a 2004R or a 700R4 to a Holley or Edelbrock carburetor, you MUST have a Geometry Corrector Kit installed. Failure to install this kit will result in transmission failure. Contact our staff for application and pricing.


4. WHAT IS THE ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR ON THE SIDE OF THE TRANSMISSION FOR?

This is a plug-in connection for the lock-up torque converter, also known as TCC [Torque Converter Clutch]. It allows your vehicle's computer to turn the converter clutch on and off as needed.


5. WHAT IF I JUST LEAVE IT OFF?

Leaving the converter clutch unplugged will overheat the transmission and converter, and damage both.


6. WHAT IF I DON'T HAVE AN ONBOARD COMPUTER IN MY CAR?

In such cases, a special kit MUST be installed in the transmission, which will actuate the converter clutch as needed. Contact our staff for info.


7. WHAT IF I USE A NON-LOCKUP CONVERTER?

A special modification MUST be made to the transmission to prevent overheating and lubrication problems, when using a non-lockup converter. Contact our staff for information and availability. Failure to install this kit when using a non-lockup converter will cause TRANSMISSION FAILURE!!


8. WHAT IS A HIGH-STALL CONVERTER?

Converter stall speed is the maximum RPM that the engine can obtain at full throttle with the transmission in gear and the BRAKES LOCKED!! Increasing engine torque will raise stall speed above advertised ratings. Note: Stall testing should only be done by qualified personnel using ALL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS.


9. WHAT IS A GOOD STALL SPEED FOR STREET USE?

Approximately 1800-2500 RPM, depending on engine size and modifications. Stall speeds above 2500 RPM result in high fluid temperatures, causing transmission problems.


10. WHEN IS A TRANS COOLER NEEDED?

ALWAYS! Install the largest trans cooler you can fit in your vehicle, and mount it in front of the radiator for maximum air flow.


11. SHOULD I GO THROUGH THE RADIATOR COOLER, ALSO?

NO! The radiator cooler is immersed in 190 degree water and is very small in capacity. It is easily contaminated and VERY difficult to clean out after a transmission failure. Its cooling ability is not adequate for high performance use.


12. WHAT TYPE OF TRANSMISSION FLUID SHOULD I USE?

Any brand of Dextron or Mercon fluid. DO NOT use Type F fluid..


13. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LOCK-UP AND OVERDRIVE?

Overdrive is a gear ratio inside the transmission of less than 1.00 to 1. For example, .95 to 1 means that, in overdrive, the input shaft turns .95 hundredths of a turn and the output shaft turns one complete turn. In most 2 and 3 speed transmissions, high gear ratio is 1.00 to 1, which is equal speed of input and output shafts. Lock-up is a function of the torque converter only. It means that the driving [or engine-driven] turbine is mechanically locked to the driven [or transmission-driving] turbine by a clutching device. A non-lockup or open converter is one with no such locking device. The driving turbine in this case is always turning faster than the driven turbine, and is thus slipping slightly, and loosing some efficiency and fuel economy, by turning the engine more RPM.


14. WHAT SHOULD MAXIMUM FLUID TEMPERATURE BE?

Transmission fluid temperature MUST NOT EXCEED 200 degrees!


15. HOW OFTEN DO I NEED TO CHANGE TRANSMISSION FLUID?

Every 12 months or 12,000 miles, under normal street / strip use. In heavy duty applications, contact our staff for more info.
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Old 01-24-2009, 09:00 PM   #2
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Some pics
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 4l60e_front_quarter_gmp.jpg (14.6 KB, 240 views)
File Type: jpg 4l60e_late_transmission.jpg (25.5 KB, 240 views)
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Old 01-25-2009, 09:03 AM   #3
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Lots of good info! Thanks for sharing.
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Old 01-25-2009, 09:07 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaneschevys View Post
Lots of good info! Thanks for sharing.
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Old 01-25-2009, 03:15 PM   #5
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Good info. Here's a good how-to and parts list link for swapping out the 4L60 to 4L80

If you're planing with a stock 4L60, don't bump the shift pressure up too much or you'll be sitting on the side of the road. How do I know this???

/replaced with a semi-grenade-proof unit that was good for 500+ hp. Was planning a stroked LS2, but sold the vehicle before I did the swap.
//'99 2wd 2dr Tahoo... last of the 2 doors.
///6.5" x 8.5" drop
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Old 02-02-2009, 10:56 AM   #6
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makes me feel good about using the 4l60e in my s10 with the v8 im throwin in there!
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Old 02-02-2009, 11:01 AM   #7
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sticky ?!!
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Old 06-11-2009, 01:54 PM   #8
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4l60 is an electronic 700r4 a 4l80 is a turbo400 with overdrive and electronicly controlled a way better trans than a 4l60
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:40 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luke View Post
I THOUGHT THIS WOULD BE SOME GOOD INFO

The 4L60-E is an automatic shift, four-speed overdrive, longitudinally positioned transmission. It is now considered to be the best rendition of the finest overdrive automatic transmission ever produced.

History
Before the Late 4L60-E transmission, there was the 700r4, which was introduced in 1982. The 4L60-E is GM's successful continuation of the ever-improving 700R4 (aka "4L60" since 1990), introduced in 1982. The 4L60-E is the "E"lectronically shift controlled version of the 4L60. The Late 4L60-E was released in 1997 in and fully phased into wide use through GM by 1998 in both RWD car platforms (including the C6 Corvette) and trucks in both 2wd and 4wd configurations.

Mechanically, the transmission's power transmitting core remained the same as its predecessor, but the valve body and actuation system for the clutches, bands, etc. is controlled by electronic actuators and solenoids. A Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) is used as the primary feedback sensor, which feeds the PCM or ECM (vehicle powertrain computer) the data to make shift decisions. The engineering of this system is not regarded as a complication, but an elegant simplification and further improvement to this transmission.

The 4L60-E derives its designation from its specifications: 4-speeds, Longitudinally positioned, 6000 lbs. GVW, Electronically controlled, although the transmission sees factory service in trucks up to 8600 lbs.

The strength of the 4L60-E has turned out to be remarkable. Now a darling of the transmission building aftermarket, the 4L60-E is capable of transmitting impressive power from both truck and performance car applications.




Identification
The Late 4L60-E transmission has a three piece case of cast aluminum alloy; bellhousing, main case, and tailhousing. GM shortened the package to 21.9" long - equivalent to a manual transmission of 15.4".

The input shaft has 30 splines. The transmission typically has pinned flare & o-ring fittings on the passenge

r side for a cooling circuit. The transmission has a square oil pan.

The key distinction of the Later 4L60-E (1997-2006) from the Early 4L60-E (1992-1997) or 4L60 (1990-1992) or 700R4 (1982-1989) is the six-bolt "hex" rear output or tailhousing / adapter pattern. The previous versions featured a four-bolt square bolt pattern at the adapter or tailhousing. Additionally, the removeable bellhousing is also another distinguishing feature.

Two-wheel-drive versions have tailhousings and typically a longer output shafts than four-wheel-drive versions, which have various adapter assemblies and a shorter output shaft.

The transmission weighs 146 pounds dry, and 162 wet. It requires 8.4 quarts (9.64" torque converter) or 11.4 quarts (11.81" torque converter) of Dextron III fluid, which the factory claims to be a lifetime fill. Deep pan versions require as much as 14 quarts. Length and volume of the cooling circuit will vary and will require an additional amount.

The 4L60-E is found in nearly every GM rear-wheel-drive application, including the C/K Truck, Sonoma, Jimmy, Tahoe, Yukon, Astro, Safari, Suburban, Bravada, Firebird, Camaro and Corvette.

GM's alternative designations of these transmissions are:

4L60E = M30
4L65E = M32
4L70E = M70
In fact, the "E" has now been removed, ostensibly due to the fact that all GM automatics are now electronically controlled and the distinction is no longer useful.

New Versions Rising
The 4L60E is now concurrently produced along with its strengthened progenitors; the 4L65-E and the 4L70-E. They share most components and improvements together. The 4L65-E was introduced in 2001 as an HD version of the 4L60-E. It has a stronger planetary and a strength-improved output shaft.

4L70-E transmission is a further improvement still, and share most components. However, these versions have strengthened and improved components for the significant power outputs of GM's impressive line of gem 111

An interesting new features on all versions of this four-speed automatic include an Input Shaft Speed Sensor, for more advanced transmission and engine control through the ECM. This sensor is located in the front pump assembly. It is to be fully implemented in all versions by 2008. Individuals swapping these parts through and across years should be aware of the compaitibility issues that this may present.

Transfer Case Adaptability
Adaptation to most of the Jeep transfer cases is an outstanding prospect.

This transmission makes an excellent conversion transmission due to its adaptability into most Jeeps. Both 2wd and 4wd versions of the 4L60-E can be used equally well, and there are no inherent advantages to either one once you have installed our adapter assembly.

Essentially all factory GM 4wd applications available with an OEM configured 4L60-E have adapters and transfer cases that are prohibitively long for a Jeep, and transfer cases whose sizes, strength and gearing fall short of desirable for most Jeep applications. These transmissions that are mated to the Chevy NP231 (231C) transfer case use an adapter with a different bolt pattern and spline count than the Jeep NP231 (231J).

Engine Compatibility and Adaptability
GM

The front face 4L60-E is natively compatible with either the Chevrolet 90 degree “Small Block” & “Big Block” patterned engines (image, right), including the V6, V8 & I6.

Because the transmission is electronically controlled by the PCM and its requisite wiring, it is usually simplest to join the 4L60-E to the engine it came with from the factory. Earlier engines can be joined to the 4L60-E by use of a GM Controller, #12497316. Carbureted engines will require a Throttle Postion Sensor. Individuals converting to earlier engines or engines not controlled by a GM PCM should consider the 700r4 as the simpler and cost-conscious alternative.


Much a part of the transmission is the Powertrain Control Module. GM has scored another hit with this intelligent setup, that puts the engine and transmission under the same management. Standalone transmission controllers do exist on the aftermarket, however it is typically better to run the OBDII / Generation III ) engine and trans as a matched pair.
Summary
GM's commitment to the 4L60-E is apparent in its strength, quality and broad usability. It is hands-down one of the most respectable transmissions of our era, and a very compelling Jeep conversion transmission. The 4L60-E is a very attractive swap option for all Jeeps, with the exception of the CJ5 and other short wheelbased Jeeps - due to powertrain length and driveshaft angle issues. Adaptability to nearly all other Jeeps is exceptional.







FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


1. WHAT ABOUT THE CABLE?

The cable on a 700R4 or 2004R is EXTREMELY important, as it controls not only the timing of the shifts, but also the oil pressure inside the transmission, which controls the firmness of the shifts. If the cable is improperly adjusted or left unhooked, THE TRANSMISSION WILL BURN UP!!


2. ISN'T THE CABLE JUST LIKE THE ONE ON A 350?

NO! The cable on a 350 only controls passing gear. If disconnected, the transmission will not be damaged. Only passing gear will be inoperative.


3. WHAT IF I USE A DIFFERENT CARBURETOR?

If you're connecting the TV cable on a 2004R or a 700R4 to a Holley or Edelbrock carburetor, you MUST have a Geometry Corrector Kit installed. Failure to install this kit will result in transmission failure. Contact our staff for application and pricing.


4. WHAT IS THE ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR ON THE SIDE OF THE TRANSMISSION FOR?

This is a plug-in connection for the lock-up torque converter, also known as TCC [Torque Converter Clutch]. It allows your vehicle's computer to turn the converter clutch on and off as needed.


5. WHAT IF I JUST LEAVE IT OFF?

Leaving the converter clutch unplugged will overheat the transmission and converter, and damage both.


6. WHAT IF I DON'T HAVE AN ONBOARD COMPUTER IN MY CAR?

In such cases, a special kit MUST be installed in the transmission, which will actuate the converter clutch as needed. Contact our staff for info.


7. WHAT IF I USE A NON-LOCKUP CONVERTER?

A special modification MUST be made to the transmission to prevent overheating and lubrication problems, when using a non-lockup converter. Contact our staff for information and availability. Failure to install this kit when using a non-lockup converter will cause TRANSMISSION FAILURE!!


8. WHAT IS A HIGH-STALL CONVERTER?

Converter stall speed is the maximum RPM that the engine can obtain at full throttle with the transmission in gear and the BRAKES LOCKED!! Increasing engine torque will raise stall speed above advertised ratings. Note: Stall testing should only be done by qualified personnel using ALL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS.


9. WHAT IS A GOOD STALL SPEED FOR STREET USE?

Approximately 1800-2500 RPM, depending on engine size and modifications. Stall speeds above 2500 RPM result in high fluid temperatures, causing transmission problems.


10. WHEN IS A TRANS COOLER NEEDED?

ALWAYS! Install the largest trans cooler you can fit in your vehicle, and mount it in front of the radiator for maximum air flow.


11. SHOULD I GO THROUGH THE RADIATOR COOLER, ALSO?

NO! The radiator cooler is immersed in 190 degree water and is very small in capacity. It is easily contaminated and VERY difficult to clean out after a transmission failure. Its cooling ability is not adequate for high performance use.


12. WHAT TYPE OF TRANSMISSION FLUID SHOULD I USE?

Any brand of Dextron or Mercon fluid. DO NOT use Type F fluid..


13. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LOCK-UP AND OVERDRIVE?

Overdrive is a gear ratio inside the transmission of less than 1.00 to 1. For example, .95 to 1 means that, in overdrive, the input shaft turns .95 hundredths of a turn and the output shaft turns one complete turn. In most 2 and 3 speed transmissions, high gear ratio is 1.00 to 1, which is equal speed of input and output shafts. Lock-up is a function of the torque converter only. It means that the driving [or engine-driven] turbine is mechanically locked to the driven [or transmission-driving] turbine by a clutching device. A non-lockup or open converter is one with no such locking device. The driving turbine in this case is always turning faster than the driven turbine, and is thus slipping slightly, and loosing some efficiency and fuel economy, by turning the engine more RPM.


14. WHAT SHOULD MAXIMUM FLUID TEMPERATURE BE?

Transmission fluid temperature MUST NOT EXCEED 200 degrees!


15. HOW OFTEN DO I NEED TO CHANGE TRANSMISSION FLUID?

Every 12 months or 12,000 miles, under normal street / strip use. In heavy duty applications, contact our staff for more info.
hi luke
thanks for the vital info.
fazel
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Old 10-08-2010, 03:42 AM   #10
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This should be sticky
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